OBITUARY FOR ROBERT H BAIRD

1872-1947

Researched and compiled by Faye V Bell, 2012

 

            Robert H Baird (Bobby) was born in Scotland 1872.  Both of his parents were born in Scotland (1900 U.S. Census and also known personally by the author).  He immigrated from Scotland to the United States in 1898, immediately got his citizenship in Philadelphia, PA, and two years later he was living in Alamo, Big Horn County[1], WY.  In Alamo (now called Manderson) he was William O Steele’s hired man, but later he and Steele became partners in the sheep business.  All three were immigrants from Scotland. He brought Agnes McIntyre from Scotland to the U.S. as his bride (married in Glasgow 22 Feb 1906) and their first child, a son whom they named Robert L Baird was born in Wyoming.  The 1910 census indicates Robert L Baird was 5/12 (meaning 5 months old when the census was taken) and the couple lived in Sunshine[2], Big Horn County, WY.  Their second son was born in 1910-1911 and was named Donald (Dan) McIntyre Baird.   Robert H Baird was active in his occupation as a sheepman in and above Ten Sleep, WY and by 1920 census they were living in Election District #6, Washakie County (Big Trails).  Upon their retirement, they moved to Worland in the early 1940’s and were residents there until his passing on May 6, 1947, Worland, WY.

 

Memories:  The Bairds had thick Scottish brogues and were not easy to understand sometimes (particularly Agnes) but they were as canny as Scots are known to be and they prospered well in Wyoming.  They were loved and appreciated in the Ten Sleep area.  According to previous research used in Vanguards of the Valley (publ 1986) , Bobby Baird was naturalized upon his arrival in Pennsylvania showing how important it was to him to be an American citizen.



[1] Alamo is now known as Manderson..

[2] In Place Names of Wyoming by Mae R Urbanek, Sunshine is nonexistent; however, there is a Sunlight Basin, Park County, WY that may be where the Scottish couple were living.  High elevation and rich meadows might be conducive to raising sheep as did Steele and Baird.