OBITUARY FOR ECHO SWEET PICKETT

 

1898-1985

 

Researched and compiled by Faye V Bell (SLC) 2012

 

            Echo J Sweet was born in Nebraska in 1898 to Will and Bertha Della Sweet.  (Combined data from Echo’s story on Pioneers and Rural Schools written for the History of Washakie County and written by its people 1976 and the 1900 Federal Census.)  In 1900 Echo was the baby of the family with her sisters listed as Imo J, Hazel A, Esther G (Gladys) and Echo herself, and the family resided in Lincoln Ward #6, Nebraska.  By the Federal Census of 1910, the family had been blessed with a son Roy who was nine at the time and a daughter Cleo who was four years old.    The census was taken from their residence in Lincoln, Antelope, Nebraska.    In 1911 Will Sweet bought 80 acres east of Worland and traveled from Elgin, Nebraska, in an emigrant car furnished by the railroad to help settle the Big Horn Basin.  Mrs. Sweet arrived with the family a few days later.

 

            As per Echo’s description of herself, she graduated in 1916 from Worland High School and she attended the University of Wyoming.   She taught school at the Mann (or Pickett) school in 1916-1917 school term for $60/month.   In 1917 she married Carl Pickett who was a rancher and stockman.  They lived on Lower Nowood creek.  The couple had five children: Otis, Wayne, Donald, Arlen and Carlene.  She reports in her article mentioned above that the children were all successful family people.  Echo was active in the community affairs—the Nowood community club for women and the Methodist Church when the family retired to Ten Sleep in 1957.  For some time she wrote local news of the Lower Nowood for the Worland Grit which preceded the Northern Wyoming Daily News.  Echo J Sweet Pickett passed away in 1985.

 

 

Memories:  I recall that the subject herein attended all of the children’s school activities.  She was a modest matron who always behaved in a comely, ladylike fashion.  I agree her children were bright and looking to the future meeting their mother’s expectations.